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Ukraine conflict: The Russian student was detained for an Instagram post

Olesya Krivtsova, a student, has missed numerous classes recently.

Olesya, 20, is under house arrest, which explains this. Her leg is equipped with an electronic tag. Her every move is observable to police.

Her supposed crime? Due to her social media posts opposing war, Olesya was detained. One of them related to the explosion that occurred on the bridge connecting Russia to the Crimean peninsula in October.

Olesya tells the BBC that she “posted an Instagram story about the bridge” and that it “reflected how Ukrainians were thrilled with what had transpired.”

Additionally, she had shared a friend’s post on the battle.

Then the drama started.

“I was on the phone with my mother when I heard the front door open, Olesya explains. Many police officers arrived. They yelled at me to lay on the floor while taking my phone away.”

The accusations against Olesya included defending terrorism and defaming the Russian military. Ten years in prison are an option for her.

Olesya Krivtsova, a student, has missed numerous classes recently.

Olesya, 20, is under house arrest, which explains this. Her leg is equipped with an electronic tag. Her every move is observable to police.

Her supposed crime? Due to her social media posts opposing war, Olesya was detained. One of them related to the explosion that occurred on the bridge connecting Russia to the Crimean peninsula in October.

Olesya tells the BBC that she “posted an Instagram story about the bridge” and that it “reflected how Ukrainians were thrilled with what had transpired.”

Additionally, she had shared a friend’s post on the battle.

Then the drama started.

“I was on the phone with my mother when I heard the front door open, Olesya explains. Many police officers arrived. They yelled at me to lay on the floor while taking my phone away.”

The accusations against Olesya included defending terrorism and defaming the Russian military. Ten years in prison are an option for her.

“Olesya says, “A buddy sent me a message about me in a conversation about how I was opposed to the’special military operation’. This conversation was primarily attended by history students. If they should report me to the authorities, they were debating.”

Extracts from the group chat have been seen by the BBC.

Olesya is charged in one comment with producing “provocative articles with a pessimistic and extreme tone. This is not appropriate at a time of war. It must be stopped in its tracks “.

“Let’s start by trying to discredit her. Allow the security services to handle it if she refuses to understand.”

Another person writes, “The responsibility of a patriot is denunciation.”

Olesya recognized the identities from the student conversation when they were later read out in court from the list of prosecution witnesses.

One year has passed since the Kremlin began its “special military operation” in Ukraine, which is what Moscow calls its full-scale invasion of its neighbor. Within weeks of the attack, President Putin urged the Russian people to distinguish between “genuine patriots and slime and traitors.”

Since then, there have been allegations of Soviet-style denunciations of war critics throughout Russia. Students spying on teachers and employees complaining about one another are two examples.

Publicly criticizing the invasion is risky, and that goes for reposting other people’s criticism as well. The Russian government anticipates complete and unwavering backing for the Ukrainian offensive.

At the very least, silence is expected if you disagree with it. A number of oppressive laws exist to punish dissent if you don’t keep quiet. This contains regulations prohibiting disseminating “false information” and “discrediting” the military.

A nine-story apartment building in Arkhangelsk bears a massive photo of a Russian soldier who died in Ukraine with the inscription, “Being a warrior means living forever.”

The patriotic messaging works well. Russians who are being prosecuted for their anti-war remarks are not well received on the streets of Arkhangelsk.

Konstantin informs me that those who spread lies about our army or denigrate it are mentally ill. “They ought to be used as cannon fodder up front.”

Ekaterina admits to me, “I take offense when people criticize the special operation.

But isn’t it harsh to receive a lengthy prison term for making an online post? I ask.

Ekaterina responds, “People should use their heads. They must follow the law if they reside here, profit from all that our nation has to offer, and consider themselves patriotic.

Later that day, Olesya is permitted to leave her apartment. but solely in order to go to a court hearing. Her defense attorneys are pleading with the judge to remove the limits on her movement.

A police van with the words “School Bus” is depicted on Olesya’s T-shirt. An observation on the way that young Russians who criticize the government are punished.

The judge decides to continue her home arrest.

Olesya asserts that “the state lacks the stomach for argument, for democracy, or for freedom.” “But they can’t lock everyone up. They eventually will run out of cells.”

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